A Level English Language - Edexcel PDF

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A LevelEnglish LanguagePAPER 3 INVESTIGATING LANGUAGESPECIMEN PAPERSPearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCE in English LanguagePaper 3 (9EN0/03)

IntroductionThis specimen paper has been produced to complement the sample assessmentmaterials for Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCE in English Language and isdesigned to provide extra practice for your students. The specimen papers are part of asuite of support materials offered by Pearson.The specimen papers do not form part of the accredited materials for this qualification.

General marking guidance All candidates must receive the same treatment. Examiners must mark the last candidate inexactly the same way as they mark the first. Mark schemes should be applied positively. Candidates must be rewarded for what they haveshown they can do rather than be penalised for omissions. Examiners should mark according to the mark scheme – not according to their perception ofwhere the grade boundaries may lie. All the marks on the mark scheme are designed to be awarded. Examiners should alwaysaward full marks if deserved, i.e. if the answer matches the mark scheme. Examiners shouldalso be prepared to award zero marks if the candidate’s response is not worthy of creditaccording to the mark scheme. Where some judgement is required, mark schemes will provide the principles by which markswill be awarded and exemplification/indicative content will not be exhaustive. When examiners are in doubt regarding the application of the mark scheme to a candidate’sresponse, a senior examiner must be consulted before a mark is given. Crossed-out work should be marked unless the candidate has replaced it with an alternativeresponse.Marking guidance – specificThe marking grids have been designed to assess student work holistically. The grids identifywhich Assessment Objective is being targeted by each bullet point within the level descriptors.One bullet point is linked to one Assessment Objective, however please note that the number ofbullet points in the level descriptor does not directly correlate to the number of marks in thelevel descriptor.When deciding how to reward an answer, examiners should consult both the indicative contentand the associated marking grid(s). When using a levels-based mark scheme, the ‘best fit’approach should be used: examiners should first decide which descriptor most closely matches the answer and place itin that level the mark awarded within the level will be decided based on the quality of the answer and willbe modified according to how securely all bullet point descriptors are met at that level in cases of uneven performance, the points above will still apply. Candidates will be placed inthe level that best describes their answer according to each of the Assessment Objectivesdescribed in the level. Marks will be awarded towards the top or bottom of that leveldepending on how they have evidenced each of the descriptor bullet points examiners of Advanced GCE English should remember that all Assessment Objectives withina level are equally weighted. They must consider this when making their judgements the mark grid identifies which Assessment Objective is being targeted by each bullet pointwithin the level descriptors indicative content is exactly that – they are factual points that candidates are likely to use toconstruct their answer. It is possible for an answer to be constructed without mentioningsome or all of these points, as long as they provide alternative responses to the indicativecontent that fulfils the requirements of the question. It is the examiner’s responsibility toapply their professional judgement to the candidate’s response in determining if the answerfulfils the requirements of the question.

Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCEEnglish LanguageAdvancedPaper 3: Investigating LanguageSpecimen Papers for first teachingSeptember 2015Pre-release materialPaper Reference9EN0/03You do not need any other materials.NB: from the 2021 assessment series these materials will be released on 1 December.Therefore the 2021 materials will be released on 1 Dec 2020.Turn overS51666A 2016 Pearson Education Ltd.1/1/1/1*S51666A*

This booklet introduces five subtopics for the examination, one for each of the five topics:The five topics are: Global English Language and Gender Identity Language and Journalism Language and Power Regional Language VariationThe summary, given for each topic, is a starting point for students to use for their ownsubtopic investigations.The suggested resource list is intended to act as guidance and students should broadentheir research beyond the list. Students and teachers need to consider carefully whichresources to use as the list is for guidance and suggestion only.Please note that resources were checked at the time of publication all web addresseswere working and all publications were available for purchase. However, materials maybe withdrawn from circulation and website locations may change.2S51666A

Topic: Global EnglishSubtopic: Singapore Colloquial EnglishSingapore was a British colony for a number of years and English is one of the four officiallanguages today. Singapore Colloquial English (also known as ‘Singlish’) is the namegiven to the English-based creole spoken by many Singaporeans which also appearsin a variety of written forms. Most Singaporeans speak more than one language. ManySingaporeans are bi-dialectal.Your investigation should focus on Singapore Colloquial English.You should research: the historical development of English in Singapore relevant language frameworks and levels of Singapore Colloquial English the influence of social and cultural changes on the development of English inSingapore.Suggested research resourcesGeneralBooksJenkins, J. (2014) Global Englishes: A Resource Book for Students. 3rd edition. Oxford:Routledge.Kirkpatrick, A. (2007) World Englishes. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Mesthrie, R. (2010) Varieties of English. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.SpecificData could be taken from recordings of speakers of Singapore Colloquial English, or fromrepresentations of the variety in newspapers, social media, blogs and websites.BooksDeterding, D. (2007) Singapore English. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.WebsitesThere is a talk about Singlish on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v LMMzDAg4VvIThe website of the Singaporean newspaper The Straits Times features a number of articleson Singlish http://www.straitstimes.com/S51666A3Turn over

Topic: Language and Gender IdentitySubtopic: Representations of Women in the HomeTraditionally the primary role of women was seen by many to be centred on the homeas a housewife or mother. Many no longer see women’s primary role in these terms, as aresult of greater social and economic independence, the influence of cultural factors andtechnological changes.Your investigation should focus on how language is used to represent women inthe home.You should research: recent developments in linguistic theory linked to gender and sexuality relevant language frameworks and levels used in representing women in the home the influence of social, cultural and historical changes on the representation ofwomen in the home.Suggested research resourcesGeneralBooksBaker, P. (2008) Sexed Texts: Language, Gender and Sexuality. London: Equinox Publishing Ltd.Sunderland, J. (2006) Language and Gender: An Advanced Resource Book. Oxford: Routledge.Talbot, M. (2010) Language and Gender. Cambridge: Polity Press.SpecificData could be taken from adverts, magazine articles, websites and other forms of media.BooksMills, S. (2008) Language and Sexism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.WebsitesA volunteer led research project examining the representations of women in the mediacan be found at www.rowitm.orgJournalsDemarest, J. and Garner, J. (2002) The Representation of Women’s Roles in Women’sMagazines Over the Past 30 Years. The Journal of Psychology, 126(4), 357–369.This can be found at http://www.csub.edu/ cgavin/Communications/art7.pdf4S51666A

Topic: Language and JournalismSubtopic: Satirical JournalismJournalists have always used satire as a way of entertaining their readers and pouringscorn or ridicule on public figures, institutions and events. However, the techniques theyemploy to do this are always changing as is the language they use.Your investigation should focus on the way language is used in satirical journalism,including print and electronic articles.You should research: the different ways journalists have used satire over time relevant language frameworks and levels used in satirical journalism the social, cultural, historical and technological changes that have taken placein journalism.Suggested research resourcesGeneralBooksFinch, G. (2013) Word of Mouth: A New Introduction to Language and Communication. 2ndedition Palgrave Macmillan.Reah, D. (2002) The Language of Newspapers (Intertext series – 2nd edition). Oxford:Routledge.WebsitesThe British Library has an online library of historical newspapers which can be accessedhere: ta could be taken from websites, newspapers, magazines and other popular media.BooksNash, W. (1985) The Language of Humour. Harlow: Longman.Simpson, P. (2003) On the Discourse of Satire: Towards a Stylistic Model of Satirical Humour.Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamin.WebsitesScanned historical copies of the satirical magazine Punch can be found athttp://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Punch %28Bookshelf%29S51666A5Turn over

Topic: Language and PowerSubtopic: Language of Political DebatePolitical debate is adversarial and is used to influence public opinion. It can be carriedout in a range of formats and locations, and may use a variety of rhetorical strategies.Social, cultural and technological changes have all affected the language used inpolitical debate.Your investigation should focus on the language used in political debates.You should research: the historical development of political debate relevant language frameworks and levels the influence of social, cultural and technological changes.Suggested research resourcesGeneralBooksFairclough, N. (2014) Language and Power. 3rd ed. Oxford: Routledge.Mooney, A. and Evans, B. (2015) Language, Society and Power: An Introduction. 4th edition.Oxford: Routledge.Simpson, P. and Mayr, A. (2010) Language and Power: A Resource Book for Students.Oxford: Routledge.SpecificData could be taken from parliamentary records and reports, TV and radio broadcasts,newspaper letters pages and print media websites.BooksAtkinson, M. (1984) Our Master’s Voices: The Language and Body-language of Politics.London: Routledge.Beard, A. (2000) The Language of Politics. London: Routledge.University thesisA study of linguistic strategies in political debate can be found /FULLTEXT016S51666A

Topic: Regional Language VariationSubtopic: East Anglian EnglishThe English of East Anglia has developed under particular historical, social and culturalcircumstances. There are recognisably distinct dialects in some parts of the region suchas Norfolk and the southern parts of Suffolk, but many features are also shared.Your investigation should focus on East Anglian English.You should research the following aspects of these regional varieties: the historical development relevant language frameworks and levels the influence of social and cultural changes.Suggested research resourcesGeneralBooksBeal, J. C. (2010) An Introduction to Regional Englishes. Edinburgh: EdinburghUniversity Library.Kortmann, J. and Upton, C. A. (Ed.) (2008) Handbook of Varieties of English 1: The BritishIsles. New York: Mouton de Gruyter.WebsitesThe British Library: www.bl.ukSpecificData could be taken from transcripts of regional speakers in the public eye,representations in the media and everyday conversations and representations inwritten form.BooksTrudgill, P. (2003) The Norfolk Dialect. Cromer: Poppyland Publishing.WebsitesA helpful piece on East Anglian dialect on the Oxford English Dictionary website can befound at n-use/east-anglian-english/A discussion of the survival of the Norfolk dialect can be found athttp://www.bbc.co.uk/norfolk/have your say/dialect.shtmlS51666A7

Write your name hereSurnameOther namesPearson EdexcelLevel 3 GCECentre NumberCandidate NumberEnglish LanguageAdvancedPaper 3: Investigating LanguageSpecimen Papers for first teachingSeptember 2015Time: 1 hour 45 minutesPaper Reference9EN0/03You must have:Source Booklet (enclosed)Total MarksInstructionsblack ink or ball-point pen. Usein the boxes at the top of this page with your name, Fillcentre number and candidate number.one question from Section A and one question from Section B –Answerboth questions should be on the topic you have chosen.the questions in the spaces provided A– nswerthere may be more space than you need.Informationtotal mark for this paper is 45. Thefor each question are shown in brackets T–heusemarksthis as a guide as to how much time to spend on each question.Adviceeach question carefully before you start to answer it. ReadCheck your answers if you have time at the end.S51666A 2016 Pearson Education Ltd.1/1/1/1*S51666A0117*Turn over

SECTION AAnswer ONE question on your chosen topic.You must answer on the same topic in both sections.Write your answer in the space provided.Topic: Global EnglishSubtopic: Singapore Colloquial English1 Read the data provided on pages 4–5 of the source booklet.To what extent are Texts A1 and A2 representative of Singapore Colloquial English?(Total for Question 1 15 marks)Topic: Language and Gender IdentitySubtopic: Representations of Women in the Home2 Read the data provided on pages 6–7 of the source booklet.To what extent are Texts B1 and B2 representative of how women in the home areportrayed?(Total for Question 2 15 marks)Topic: Language and JournalismSubtopic: Satirical Journalism3 Read the data provided on pages 8–9 of the source booklet.To what extent is Text C representative of the ways in which language is used insatirical journalism?(Total for Question 3 15 marks)2*S51666A0217*

Topic: Language and PowerSubtopic: Language of Political Debate4 Read the data provided on pages 10–11 of the source booklet.To what extent is Text D representative of the language of political debate?(Total for Question 4 15 marks)Topic: Regional Language VariationSubtopic: East Anglian English5 Read the data provided on pages 12–13 of the source booklet.To what extent does Text E represent aspects of spoken East Anglian English?(Total for Question 5 15 marks)*S51666A0317*3Turn over

Indicate which question you are answering by marking a cross in the box . If you change yourmind, put a line through the box and then indicate your new question with a cross .Chosen question number: Question 1Question 2Question 4Question 5Question 3. . . . . . . . . . . .

Topic: Global English Subtopic: Singapore Colloquial English Singapore was a British colony for a number of years and English is one of the four official languages today. Singapore Colloquial English (also known as ‘Singlish’) is the name given to the English-based creole spoken by many Singaporeans which also appears in a variety of written forms. Most Singaporeans speak more than one ...