Embedding Cultures And Diversity Within An Early Years Setting PDF

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Embedding Cultures and Diversity within an early years settingand Supporting children learning English as an additional languageEmbedding Cultures and Diversity within an early years settingand Supporting children learning English as an additional languageDon’t judge me by my hairor by the clothes I wear,the colour of my skinthe relationship I’m in,the career path I have trodor who I see as GodDon’t judge me by my hairor by the clothes I wear,the colour of my skinthe relationship I’m in,the career path I have trodor who I see as GodSTOP!STOP!Look deeperYou will seeI’m a lot like youAnd you’re a lot like me.Look deeperYou will seeI’m a lot like youAnd you’re a lot like me.

Embedding Cultures and Diversity within an early years settingand Supporting children learning English as an additional languageIntroduction Every child deserves the best possible start in lifeand the support that enables them to fulfil theirpotential.Statutory Framework for the EYFS 2014 There are an increasing number of children inCumbria who have English as an additional language(EAL). It is essential that settings develop children’slearning abilities in all aspects of English to enablethem to participate fully in education and society as awhole. At the same time children’s home languagesmust be recognised, valued and supported. Our EAL guidance sets out to improve teachingexpertise in early years settings so that all childrenwill be welcomed into a fully inclusive learningenvironment that truly values individual diversity. Children learn a language byhearing it and wantingto communicate. The most important resource inthe early years setting is YOUtalking and listening.The arrival of a new child with EAL should be anexciting time. Practitioners may need to makeadaptations to their environment and their routinesto meet the needs of these children. This guidanceshould be used to help you support these pupils, toenable them to settle quickly and to begin to acquirea new language and use this language to learn. All members of the team should be giveninformation about newly arrived children. Thismay take the form of a summary of informationfrom the home visit or admissions form, to beshared through staff meetings, briefings, handoutsor staff noticeboards (maintain confidentiality). Ensure that children understand the routine sothat they feel safe and secure, for example avisual timetable.Find out how to say a few key phrases - forexample, hello, please, thank you - in their homelanguage and display these around the room.Ensure that practitioners talk normally to thechild and their family.Flexibility is very important for the first fewweeks – the child may have never attended achildcare setting. They may get very tired so itmay be appropriate for them to only attend parttime. This needs careful consideration by bothstaff and parents, or carers.Children with EAL may not speak for some time.Allow them to remain silent – this may take afew months.Ensure that children can communicate basicneeds, such as going to the toilet or feeling sick.For example, provide EAL fans (see resourcesection on pxx)Identifying a ‘buddy’ will prove extremelysupportive – this child can act as a friend duringthe first days and weeks. This needs to be aconfident child; it would also be beneficial if theyshare the newcomer’s language.Practitioners must support the child in managingpotentially stressful situations such as using thetoilets, going to lunch, at snack time and wheninvolved in things with different adults or indifferent rooms.Children with EAL should not be consideredas having Special Educational Needs (SEN) andshould not be automatically identified for SENsupport.Children who are learning EAL will learn morequickly alongside fluent users of English whocan provide good language and learning rolemodels. During group sessions ensure that thechild is included in groups that can provide goodrole models in terms of language and learningin order to create the best fit for his or herlanguage and learning needs.You do not have to know any words of anotherperson’s language to make them feel welcome.Embedding Cultures and Diversity within an early years settingand Supporting children learning English as an additional languageWhen each person is valued for who they are anddifferences are appreciated, everyone feels included andunderstood, whatever their personality, abilities, ethnicbackground or culture.EYFS 2007, Positive Relationships 2.1 There are an increasing number of children inCumbria who have English as an additional language(EAL). It is essential that settings develop children’slearning abilities in all aspects of English to enablethem to participate fully in education and society asa whole. At the same time children’s home languagesmust be recognised, valued and supported. Our EAL guidance sets out to improve teachingexpertise in early years settings so that all childrenwill be welcomed into a fully inclusive learningenvironment that truly values individual diversity. Children learn a language byhearing it and wantingto communicate. The most important resource inthe early years setting is YOUtalking and listening.Introduction The arrival of a new child with EAL should bean exciting time. Practitioners may need to makeadaptations to their environment and their routinesto meet the needs of these children. This guidanceshould be used to help you support these pupils, toenable them to settle quickly and to begin to acquirea new language and use this language to learn. All members of the team should be giveninformation about newly arrived children. Thismay take the form of a summary of informationfrom the home visit or admissions form, to beshared through staff meetings, briefings, handoutsor staff noticeboards (maintain confidentiality). Ensure that children understand the routine sothat they feel safe and secure, for example avisual timetable.Find out how to say a few key phrases - forexample, hello, please, thank you - in their homelanguage and display these around the room.Ensure that practitioners talk normally to thechild and their family.Flexibility is very important for the first fewweeks – the child may have never attended achildcare setting. They may get very tired so itmay be appropriate for them to only attend parttime. This needs careful consideration by bothstaff and parents or carers.Children with EAL may not speak for some time.Allow them to remain silent – this may take afew months.Ensure that children can communicate basicneeds, such as going to the toilet or feeling sick.For example, provide EAL fans (see resourcesection on pxx)Identifying a ‘buddy’ will prove extremelysupportive – this child can act as a friend duringthe first days and weeks. This needs to be aconfident child; it would also be beneficial if theyshare the newcomer’s language.Practitioners must support the child in managingpotentially stressful situations such as using thetoilets, going to lunch, at snack time and wheninvolved in things with different adults or indifferent rooms.Children with EAL should not be consideredas having Special Educational Needs (SEN) andshould not be automatically identified for SENsupport.Children who are learning EAL will learn morequickly alongside fluent users of English whocan provide good language and learning rolemodels. During group sessions ensure that thechild is included in groups that can provide goodrole models in terms of language and learningin order to create the best fit for his or herlanguage and learning needs.You do not have to know any words of anotherperson’s language to make them feel welcome.

Embedding Cultures and Diversity within an early years settingand Supporting children learning English as an additional languageEstablishing a welcoming andinclusive environmentThe role of the practitionerFor children whose home language is not English,providers must take reasonable steps to provideopportunities for children to develop and use theirhome language in play and learning, supportingtheir language development at home.Statutory Framework for the EYFS 2014The environment plays a key role in supporting andextending children’s learning and development:A welcoming environment with approachablestaff helps to create effective communication.The role of the practitioner is vital in supportingchildren learning English as an additional languageto learn successfully. Children have to be given theopportunity to interact with adults on a regular basis,in a relaxed atmosphere and in meaningful contexts.Effective communication means there is atwo-way flow of information, knowledge andexpertise between parents and practitioners.All communication is important, including gesture,signing and body language. Actions can speaklouder than words.Practitioners need to: provide an atmosphere of safety; observe children to ensure you planappropriately for their ongoing development; role model language to introduce children tonew structures and vocabulary; be a good listener; create meaningful situations in which children areencouraged to communicate; pose open questions and explore areas ofinterest to the child; engage in talk during shared activities; be encouraging without being demanding; allow children time to think, reflect and quietlyabsorb the language around them; and use careful enunciation of words and phrases.Posters, pictures and other resources on displaywill show the setting’s positive attitudes toethnic, cultural and social diversity. They will helpchildren and families to recognise that they arevalued.Display lists of words from home languagesused by children in the setting and invite parentsto contribute to them. Seeing their languagereflected in this way will encourage parents tofeel involved and valued.Find out from parents the greetings they useeither in English or in other languages. Encouragestaff, parents and children to use these greetings.Embedding Cultures and Diversity within an early years settingand Supporting children learning English as an additional languageThe role of the practitionerEstablishing a welcoming andinclusive environmentPractitioners ensure that their own knowledge aboutdifferent cultural groups is up-to-date and considertheir own attitudes to people who are different fromthemselves.EYFS 2007, Inclusive Practice 1.2Posters, pictures and other resources on display willshow the setting’s positive attitudes to disability, and toethnic, cultural and social diversity. They will help childrenand families to recognise that they are valued.EYFS 2007, Parents as Partners 2.2The role of the practitioner is vital in supportingchildren learning English as an additional languageto learn successfully. Children have to be given theopportunity to interact with adults on a regular basis,in a relaxed atmosphere and in meaningful contexts.The environment plays a key role in supporting andextending children’s learning and development:Practitioners need to: provide an atmosphere of safety; observe children to ensure you planappropriately for their ongoing development; role model language to introduce children tonew structures and vocabulary; be a good listener; create meaningful situations in which children areencouraged to communicate; pose open questions and explore areas ofinterest to the child; engage in talk during shared activities; be encouraging without being demanding; allow children time to think, reflect and quietlyabsorb the language around them; and use careful enunciation of words and phrases.Ensure that children understand routines andknow what they can access independently andwhen and how to seek adult support. A welcoming environment with approachablestaff helps to create effective communication. Effective communication means there is atwo-way flow of information, knowledge andexpertise between parents and practitioners. All communication is important, including gesture,signing and body language. Actions can speaklouder than words. Posters, pictures and other resources on displaywill show the setting’s positive attitudes to ethnic,cultural and social diversity. They will help childrenand families to recognise that they are valued. Display lists of words from home languagesused by children in the setting and invite parentsto contribute to them. Seeing their languagereflected in this way will encourage parents tofeel involved and valued. Find out from parents the greetings they useeither in English or in other languages. Encouragestaff, parents and children to use these greetings. Ensure that children understand routines andknow what they can access independently andwhen and how to seek adult support.

Embedding Cultures and Diversity within an early years settingand Supporting children learning English as an additional languageEmbedding Cultures and Diversity within an early years settingand Supporting children learning English as an additional languagethe language they know best, regardless of whocan understand them. Each child must be carefullyobserved, so that when their situation begins tochange, parents and practitioners can support theirnext steps.Meeting the requirements of theEarly Years Foundation Stage– supporting children with EALEffective practice, challenges and dilemmas, andreflecting on practiceThere are specific skills that can be taught effectivelythrough scaffolding, modelling and plannedinterventions following observations to assess need.However, there are no ‘magic answers’ to supportingchildren learning English. Like all children, thoselearning EAL thrive and learn best where practice isexcellent. Key factors include: the inclusive attitude and ethos set by leadersand managers, and required of all practitioners inthe setting; an understanding that bilingualism is an asset; genuinely reflective practice; and an adherence to the belief that every childmatters.A Unique ChildPrinciple – Every child is a unique child who isconstantly learning and can be resilient, capable,confident and self assured.Development Matters in the EYFS 2012Effective practiceAll children and their families are unique. Developingeffective practice for children learning EAL requirespractitioners to consider circumstances and situationswhich may be unfamiliar to them. Working to ensurethat practice is truly inclusive requires practitionersto really examine what they do, to ensure that allchildren and families receive equitable services andhave opportunities to participate, to be heard and tofeel a sense of belonging within the setting.Challenges and dilemmasPractitioners should refer to the Challenges &Dilemmas on the 'Principles into Practice cards' for AUnique Child and consider these in light of workingwith children and families for whom English is anadditional language (The EYFS 2008):Children learn at different rates, in different waysand will vary in their home and family backgroundexperiences; great care should be taken not to makeany assumptions about them due to their par

and Supporting children learning English as an additional language Embedding Cultures and Diversity within an early years setting and Supporting children learning English as an additional language • Ensure that children understand the routine so that they feel safe and secure, for example a visual timetable. Find out how to say a few key phrases - for example, hello, please, thank you - in ...