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Grade 1ArkansasEnglish Language Arts Standards2016

Grade 1 Table of ContentsIntroduction . .3How to Read This Document . .4Arkansas Anchor Standards for Reading . . . .7Grade 1 Reading Standards for Literature . .8Grade 1 Reading Standards for Informational Text . . .10Grade 1 Reading Standards for Foundational Skills . .13Arkansas Anchor Standards for Writing . 20Grade 1 Writing Standards . .21Arkansas Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening . .25Grade 1 Speaking and Listening Standards . .26Arkansas Anchor Standards for Language . 28Grade 1 Language Standards . .29Glossary . 34Contributors . .2Grade 1 ELAArkansas English Language Arts StandardsArkansas Department of Education201636

IntroductionThe Arkansas English Language Arts Standards for Grades K-12 have been developed to prepare students for success after highschool. Students who are successful in college and careers have attained particular literacy capacities. These students demonstrate independence; build strong content knowledge; respond to the varying demands of audience, task, purpose, and discipline; comprehend as well as critique; value evidence; use technology and digital media strategically and capably; come to understand other perspectives and cultures.The English classroom focuses on reading and analyzing literature and literary nonfiction, studying the English language, and writingabout related topics. A separate document, the Arkansas Disciplinary Literacy Standards, has been created to address the uniqueliteracy needs in other content areas.This document is organized around anchor standards and grade-level standards. The anchor standards address overarchingknowledge and skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. Although the document is organized by strands, thestandards should be integrated during instruction. The grade-level standards, which are aligned to the anchor standards, representthe progression of learning for Grades K-12. The grade-level standards include teacher notes that provide explanations, definitions,and links to resources to support teachers.The document focuses on literacy skills rather than literary content. Teachers have the opportunity to select grade-appropriateliterature and literary nonfiction texts to teach the standards. The texts must provide opportunities to teach all the strands at gradelevel rigor. Three measures of text complexity should guide text selection: quantitative, qualitative, and reader and task. Teachernotes in the grade-level documents provide support for effective text selection.Teachers are encouraged to become familiar with the standards above and below the grade level they teach. The standards belowgrade level will guide decisions for providing interventions for students who do not have all the grade-level skills in place, and thestandards above grade level will guide decisions for extending students who are ready to move ahead. In addition, familiarity with theK-12 standards will support developing a smooth learning progression from kindergarten through high school.The Arkansas Department of Education academic standards are intended to assist in district curriculum development, unit design,and to provide a uniform, comprehensive guide for instruction. The standards are not intended to be a state-mandated curriculum.3Grade 1 ELAArkansas English Language Arts StandardsArkansas Department of Education2016

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Arkansas Anchor Standards for ReadingThe standards on the following pages define what students should understand and be able to do by the end of the grade orgrade span. The grade-specific standards correspond by number to the Arkansas Anchor Standards for Reading. The ArkansasAnchor Standards and grade-specific standards are necessary complements--the former providing broad standards, the latterproviding additional specificity--that together define the skills and understandings that all students must demonstrate.Key Ideas and Details1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidencewhen writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details andideas.3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.Craft and Structure4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurativemeaning; analyze how specific word choices shape meaning and/or tone.5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section,chapter, scene, stanza) relate to each other and the whole.6. Assess how point of view, perspective, and/or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.Integration of Knowledge and Ideas7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats.8. Analyze and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as therelevance and sufficiency of the evidence9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approachesof the author(s).Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.Note on Range and Content of Student Reading Grades K-5To build a foundation for college and career readiness, students must read widely and deeply from among a broad range ofhigh-quality, increasingly challenging literary and informational texts. Through extensive reading of stories, dramas, and poemsfrom diverse cultures and different time periods, students gain literary and cultural knowledge as well as familiarity with varioustext structures and elements. By reading texts in history/social studies, science, and other disciplines, students build afoundation of knowledge in these fields that will also give them the background to be better readers in all content areas.Students can only gain this foundation when the curriculum is intentionally and coherently structured to develop rich contentknowledge within and across grades. Students also acquire the habits of reading independently and closely, which are essentialto their future success.7Grade 1 ELAArkansas English Language Arts StandardsArkansas Department of Education2016

Grade 1 Reading Standards for LiteratureThe grade-level standards offer a focus for instruction each year and help ensure that students gain adequate exposure to a rangeof texts and tasks. Rigor is also infused through the requirement that students read increasingly complex texts through the grades.Students advancing through the grades are expected to meet each year’s grade-specific standards and retain or further developskills and understandings mastered in preceding grades.Key Ideas and DetailsRL.1.1Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.RL.1.2Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson.Teacher NoteRL.1.2Retell is an informal written or oral ordering of narrative events which does not necessarily include the following: clear sequence,context, first or third person, past tense, or closure (e.g., evaluates; summarizes; addresses message, lesson, moral).The following link provides a discussion of the differences among the terms “retell,” “recount,” and“summarize”: de.(Conrad-Curry, Dea. “Retell, Recount, Summarize? A Common Core Shift from Kindergarten to Fourth Grade.” Blog. Partner InEducation, Feb. 2013, de.Accessed 30 Aug. 2016.)RL.1.3Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.Craft and StructureRL.1.4Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses (e.g., “soon the roundmoon was shining” [Lobel, Arnold. “Owl and the Moon.” Owl at Home. HarperCollins, 1975]).RL.1.5Explain major differences between books that tell stories and books that give information, drawing on a wide readingof a range of text types.RL.1.6Identify who is telling the story at various points in a text.8Grade 1 ELAArkansas English Language Arts StandardsArkansas Department of Education2016

Integration of Knowledge and IdeasRL.1.7RL.1.8RL.1.9Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.RL.1.8 is not applicable to literature based on anchor standard R.CCR.8.Analyze and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validityof the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories.Range of Reading and Level of Text ComplexityRL.1.10With prompting and support, read prose and poetry of appropriate complexity for Grade 1.Teacher NoteRL.1.10It is critical that children are reading on grade-level. “In 2011, sociologist Donald Hernandez reported that children who do not readproficiently by the end of third grade are four times more likely to leave school without a diploma than proficient readers.” (Fiester,Leila. “Early Warning Confirmed.” The Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2013, 013.pdf#page 11. Accessed 30 Aug. 2016.) This research places emphasis on reading instruction and creates a sense ofurgency that all children learn to read proficiently on grade level by the end of Grade 3.Kindergarten and Grade 1 must lay a strong foundation for students to read on grade level at the end of Grade 3 and beyond.Students in Grade 1 should be reading independently in the Lexile range between 190L-530L. Students reading at the lower end ofthe range will need more support to read independently on grade level by the end of Grade 3 and beyond. The Lexile rangesoverlap, recognizing that students can slip back if they do not receive reading support such as during summer break.Districts choose instructional materials for reading instruction. Text complexity is described in curricular materials using numbers orletters to indicate a learning progression for reading. It is important that the district compare the text complexity of the chosencurriculum against the grade-level Lexile range to ensure that the texts students are expected to read are on grade level. Tomaintain consistency in rigor and to allow for measuring growth, it will be helpful if a district maintains the same system formeasuring text complexity over time and across the grades for accurate comparability.9Grade 1 ELAArkansas English Language Arts StandardsArkansas Department of Education2016

Grade 1 Reading Standards for Informational TextThe grade-level standards offer a focus for instruction each year and help ensure that students gain adequate exposure to a rangeof texts and tasks. Rigor is also infused through the requirement that students read increasingly complex texts through the grades.Students advancing through the grades are expected to meet each year’s grade-specific standards and retain or further developskills and understandings mastered in preceding grades.Key Ideas and DetailsRI.1.1Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.RI.1.2Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.Teacher NoteRI.1.2Retell is an informal written or oral ordering of narrative events which does not necessarily include the following: clear sequence,context, first or third person, past tense, or closure (e.g., evaluates; summarizes; addresses message, lesson, moral).The following link provides a discussion of the differences among the terms “retell,” “recount,” and“summarize”: de.(Conrad-Curry, Dea. “Retell, Recount, Summarize? A Common Core Shift from Kindergarten to Fourth Grade.” Blog. Partner InEducation, Feb. 2013, de.Accessed 30 Aug. 2016.)An example of how to identify the main idea and supporting key details is provided below:The main idea of the text is that sharks have unique characteristics. “Sharks are actually a type of fish.” “Sharks have lots of teeth that are arranged in many rows rather than in just one row like people.” “One of the things particularly special about sharks is they have been around a long time.”The first sentence of every paragraph in every text will not necessarily contain a key detail, but it is true for this text.(“Shark Facts.” IRCMS-Third Grade Reading Passages. www.ncsu.edu/project/lancet/third.htm, 2016,https://www.ncsu.edu/project/lancet/third grade/sharks3.pdf. Accessed 24 September 2016.)RI.1.3Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.10Grade 1 ELAArkansas English Language Arts StandardsArkansas Department of Education2016

Craft and StructureRI.1.4Ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases in a text.RI.1.5Know and use various text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locatekey facts or information in a text.Teacher NoteRI.1.5Text features should be presented in a systematic way within an aligned curriculum.RI.1.6Distinguish between information provided by pictures or other illustrations and information provided by the words in atext.Integration of Knowledge and IdeasRI.1.7Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas.RI.1.8Identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.RI.1.9Identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions,procedures).11Grade 1 ELAArkansas English Language Arts StandardsArkansas Department of Education2016

Range of Readi

Kindergarten and Grade 1 must lay a strong foundation for students to read on grade level at the end of Grade 3 and beyond. Students in Grade 1 should be reading independently in the Lexile range between 190L530L.