Russian Language And Culture - Columbia University PDF

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Russian Language and CultureRUSSIAN LANGUAGE ANDCULTUREDepartmental Office: 708 Hamilton; ctor of Undergraduate Studies:Prof. Jessica Merrill, 715 Hamilton Hall; 2120854-3941;[email protected] Language Program Director:Prof. Alla Smyslova, 708 Hamilton; 212-854-8155; [email protected] Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures is devoted to thestudy of the cultures, literatures, and languages of Russia and otherSlavic peoples and lands. We approach our study and teaching of thesecultures with an eye to their specificity and attention to their interactionwith other cultures, in history and in the contemporary global context.We focus not only on the rich literary tradition, but also on the film,theater, politics, art, music, media, religious thought, critical theory,and intellectual history of Russians and other Slavs. Our approach isinterdisciplinary.Students who take our courses have different interests. Many of ourcourses are taught in English with readings in English and have noprerequisites. As a consequence, our majors and concentrators are joinedby students from other literature departments, by students of history andpolitical science who have a particular interest in the Slavic region, andby others who are drawn to the subject matter for a variety of intellectualand practical reasons.We provide instruction in Russian at all levels (beginning through veryadvanced), with a special course for heritage speakers. To improvethe proficiency of Russian learners and speakers, we offer a numberof literature and culture courses in which texts are read in the originaland discussion is conducted in Russian. We offer three levels of otherSlavic languages: Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian, Czech, Polish, and Ukrainian(with additional courses in culture in English). All language courses inthe Slavic Department develop the four basic language skills (speaking,listening, reading, and writing) and cultural understanding.Our department prides itself on the intellectual vitality of its program andon the sense of community among students and faculty. As they exploreRussian and Slavic languages, literatures, and cultures, students developnot only their specific knowledge and cultural understanding, but also thecapacity for critical thought, skills in analyzing literary and other texts,and the ability to express their ideas orally and in writing. Our graduateshave used their knowledge and skills in different ways: graduate school,Fulbright and other fellowships, journalism, publishing, law school, NGOwork, public health, government work, and politics. Our faculty is proud ofits students and graduates.Majors and ConcentrationsGuided by the director of undergraduate studies and other facultymembers, students majoring in Slavic create a program that suits theirintellectual interests and academic goals. They choose from threetracks: Russian Language and Culture (for those with a strong interestin mastering the language), Russian Literature and Culture (for thosewho want to focus on literary and cultural studies), and Slavic Studies (aflexible regional studies major for those interested in one or more Slavic1cultures). In each major, students may count related courses in otherdepartments among their electives.In addition to its majors, the department offers five concentrations.Three are analogous to the major tracks (Russian Language and Culture,Russian Literature and Culture, and Slavic Studies). There is also aconcentration in Russian Literature that does not require language studyand another concentration in Slavic Cultures that allows students tofocus on a Slavic language and culture other than Russian.Motivated seniors are encouraged but not required to write a seniorthesis. Those who write a thesis enroll in the Senior Seminar in the fallterm and work individually with a thesis adviser. Students have written ona wide range of topics in literature, culture, media, and politics.Slavic Culture at Columbia Outside of theClassroomAll interested students are welcome to take part in departmentalactivities, such as conversation hours, Slavic student organizations,the department's various film series (Russian, East Central European,Central Asian, and Ukrainian), and the country's first undergraduatejournal of Eastern European and Eurasian Culture, The Birch. The SlavicDepartment has close ties to the Harriman Institute and the East CentralEuropean Center, which sponsor lectures, symposia, performances, andconferences.Study and Research AbroadThe department encourages its students to enrich their culturalknowledge and develop their language skills by spending a semesteror summer studying in Russia, the Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine, orthe countries of the former Yugoslavia. The department helps studentsfind the program that suits their needs and interests. Undergraduatesmay apply to the Harriman Institute for modest scholarships for researchduring winter/spring breaks or the summer.Advanced/NEWL PlacementA score of 5 on the AP/NEWL Russian exam satisfies the foreignlanguage requirement. Upon successful completion of a 3-point 3000level (or higher) course at Columbia, the Department of Slavic Languageswill award 3 points of AP credit, provided the grade in the course is a Bor better. Courses taught in English may not be used to earn AP credit.No credit or placement is given for the SAT II Subject test. If you wish tocontinue with Russian at Columbia, you should take the departmentalplacement test and speak with the Russian program director prior toregistration to ensure proper placement.ProfessorsValentina IzmirlievaLiza KnappMark Lipovetsky (Leiderman)Cathy PopkinIrina Reyfman (Chair)Assistant ProfessorsAdam LeedsJessica Merrill

2Russian Language and CultureVisiting Assistant ProfessorsRUSS UN3223Magical Mystery Tour: The Legacy of OldRus'SLCL UN3001Slavic CulturesSenior LecturersRUSS GU4006Russian Religious Thought, Praxis, andLiteratureAlla SmyslovaCLRS GU4022LecturersRussia and Asia: Orientalism,Eurasianism, InternationalismRUSS GU4107Aleksandar BoskovicChristopher CaesChristopher HarwoodNataliya KunYuri ShevchukRussian Literature and Culture in theNew MillenniumFive additional courses in Russian culture, history, literature, art, film,music, or in linguistics, chosen in consultation with the director ofundergraduate studies. At least one of the selected courses should betaught in RussianOn LeaveMajor in Russian Literature and CultureHolly Myers (Barnard)Valentina Izmirlieva (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)Jessica Merrill (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)Aleksandar Boskovic (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)Guidelines for all Slavic Majors andConcentratorsSenior ThesisA senior thesis is not required for any Slavic major. Students whowish to undertake a thesis project should confer with the director ofundergraduate studies during the registration period in April of theirjunior year and register to take RUSS UN3595 Senior Seminar in the fallterm of their senior year. Students can opt to expand the thesis into atwo-semester project register for RUSS UN3998 Supervised IndividualResearch, with their thesis adviser, in the spring term of their senior year.Senior Seminar may satisfy one elective requirement; the optional secondsemester of thesis work adds one course to the 15 required for the major.The goal of this major is to make students conversant with a varietyof Russian literary, historical and theoretical texts in the original, andto facilitate a critical understanding of Russian literature, culture, andsociety. It is addressed to students who would like to complementserious literary studies with intensive language training, and is especiallysuitable for those who intend to pursue an academic career in the Slavicfield.The program of study consists of 15 courses, distributed as follows:Six semesters of coursework in Russian language (from first- throughthird-year Russian) or the equivalent.Select three of the following surveys; two of which must be in Russianliterature (RUSS UN3220 and RUSS UN3221)RUSS UN3220Literature and Empire: The Reign ofthe Novel in Russia (19th Century) [InEnglish]RUSS UN3221LIT # REVOLUTION (20TH C LIT)RUSS UN3223Magical Mystery Tour: The Legacy of OldRus'SLCL UN3001Slavic CulturesRUSS GU4006Russian Religious Thought, Praxis, andLiteratureCLRS GU4022Russia and Asia: Orientalism,Eurasianism, InternationalismMajor in Russian Language and CultureRUSS GU4107Russian Literature and Culture in theNew MillenniumThis major is intended for students who aim to attain maximal proficiencyin the Russian language. Intensive language training is complementedby an array of elective courses in Russian culture that allow studentsto achieve critical understanding of contemporary Russian society andof Russian-speaking communities around the world. Since this majoremphasizes language acquisition, it is not appropriate for native Russianspeakers.Six additional courses in Russian literature, culture, history, film, art,music, or in advanced Russian language, chosen in consultation with thedirector of undergraduate studies. At least one course should be taughtin RussianGradingCourses in which a grade of D has been received do not count towardmajor or concentration requirements.The program of study consists of 15 courses, distributed as follows:Eight semesters of coursework in Russian language (from first- throughfourth-year Russian) or the equivalentSelect two of the following surveys; at least one of these should be aRussian literature survey (RUSS UN3220 or RUSS UN3221):RUSS UN3220Literature and Empire: The Reign ofthe Novel in Russia (19th Century) [InEnglish]RUSS UN3221LIT # REVOLUTION (20TH C LIT)Students considering graduate study in Russian literature are stronglyadvised to complete four years of language training.Major in Slavic StudiesThis flexible major provides opportunities for interdisciplinary studieswithin the Slavic field. Students are encouraged to choose one targetlanguage (Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian, Czech, Polish, Russian, orUkrainian), though there are possibilities for studying a second Slaviclanguage as well. Generally, the major has one disciplinary focus inhistory, political science, economics, religion, anthropology, sociology,art, film, or music. In addition, this program allows students to focus on aparticular Slavic (non-Russian) literature and culture or to do comparativestudies of several Slavic literatures, including Russian. Students should

Russian Language and Cultureplan their program with the director of undergraduate studies as early aspossible, since course availability varies from year to year.concentration emphasizes language acquisition, it is not appropriate fornative speakers of the target language.The program of study consists of 15 courses, distributed as follows:The program of study consists of 10 courses, distributed as follows:Six semesters of coursework in one Slavic language (from firstthrough third-year Russian, Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian, Czech, Polish, orUkrainian) or the equivalent.Six semesters of coursework in one Slavic language (from first- throughthird-year Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian, Czech, Polish, or Ukrainian) or theequivalent.Two relevant courses in Russian, East/Central European or Eurasianhistory.Two relevant literature or culture courses in Slavic, preferably related tothe target language.Four additional courses in Slavic literature, culture or history, or inlinguistics, chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduatestudies; at least two should be directly related to the target language ofstudy.Five additional courses with Slavic content in history, political science,economics, literature, religion, anthropology, sociology, art, film, or music,chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. Twoof these electives may be language courses for students who opt toinclude a second Slavic language in their program.Concentration in Russian Literature andCultureAltogether students should complete four courses in a single discipline,including, if appropriate, the required history or literature/culture courses.Concentration in Russian Language andCultureThe goal of this concentration is to make students conversant with avariety of Russian literary texts and cultural artifacts that facilitate acritical understanding of Russian culture. It is addressed to students whowould like to combine language training with study of the Russian literarytradition.The program of study consists of 10 courses, distributed as follows:This program is intended for students who aim to attain proficiency in theRussian language. Intensive language training is complemented by anarray of elective courses in Russian culture that allow students to achievecritical understanding of contemporary Russian society and of Russianspeaking communities around the world. Since this concentrationemphasizes language acquisition, it is not appropriate for native Russianspeakers.Four semesters of coursework in Russian language (first- and secondyear Russian) or the equivalent.The program of study consists of 10 courses, distributed as follows:Six semesters of coursework in Russian language (from first- throughthird-year Russian) or the equivalent.Select one of the following surveys:SLCL UN3001Slavic CulturesRUSS UN3220Literature and Empire: The Reign ofthe Novel in Russia (19th Century) [InEnglish]RUSS UN3221LIT # REVOLUTION (20TH C LIT)RUSS UN3223Magical Mystery Tour: The Legacy of OldRus'CLRS GU4022Russia and Asia: Orientalism,Eurasianism, InternationalismThree additional courses in Russian culture, history, literature, art, film,music, or in linguistics, chosen in consultation with the director ofundergraduate studies; at least one of the selected courses should betaught in Russian.RUSS GU4107Russian Literature and Culture in theNew MillenniumConcentration in Slavic (Non-Russian)Language and CultureThis program is intended for students who aim to attain proficiency ina Slavic language other than Russian. Intensive language training iscomplemented by an array of elective courses in Slavic cultures thatallow students to achieve critical understanding of the communitiesthat are shaped by the Slavic language of their choice. Since this3Select two of the following surveys; one of which must be a literaturesurvey (RUSS UN3220 or RUSS UN3221)RUSS UN3220Literature and Empire: The Reign ofthe Novel in Russia (19th Century) [InEnglish]RUSS UN3221LIT # REVOLUTION (20TH C LIT)RUSS UN3223Magical Mystery Tour: The Legacy of OldRus'RUSS GU4006Russian Religious Thought, Praxis, andLiteratureSLCL UN3001Slavic CulturesCLRS GU4022Russia and Asia: Orientalism,Eurasianism, InternationalismRUSS GU4107Russian Literature and Culture in theNew MillenniumFour additional courses in Russian literature, culture, and history, chosenin consultation with the director of undergraduate studies.Concentration in Slavic StudiesThis flexible concentration provides opportunities for interdisciplinarystudies within the Slavic field. Students are encouraged to choose onetarget language (Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian, Czech, Polish, Russian,or Ukrainian), and one disciplinary focus in history, political science,economics, religion, anthropology, sociology, art, film, or music. Inaddition, this program allows students to focus on a particular Slavic(non-Russian) literature and culture, or to do comparative studies ofseveral Slavic literatures, including Russian.The program of study consists of 10 courses, distributed as follows:Four semesters of coursework in one Slavic language (first- and secondyear Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian, Czech, Polish, Russian, or Ukrainian) orthe equivalent.One relevant courses in Russian, East/Central European or Eurasianhistory.

4Russian Language and CultureOne relevant literature or culture course in Slavic, preferably related tothe target language.Four additional courses with Slavic content in history, political science,economics, literature, religion, anthropology, sociology, art, film, or music,chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studiesBCRS UN2101 Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. 3 points.Prerequisites: BCRS UN1102 or the equivalent.Readings in Serbian/Croatian/Bosnian literature in the original, withemphasis depending upon the needs of individual students.Fall 2020: BCRS UN2101Altogether students should complete three courses in a single discipline,including, if appropriate, the required history or literature/culture courses.Concentration in Russian LiteratureSelect two of the following Russian literature surveys (in translation):RUSS UN3221LIT # REVOLUTION (20TH C LIT)NumberBCRS entM W F 11:40am -Aleksandar35/1212:55pmBoskovicBCRS UN2102 Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. 3 points.Prerequisites: BCRS UN1102 or the equivalent.Readings in Serbian/Croatian/Bosnian literature in the original, withemphasis depending upon the needs of individual students. This coursenumber has been changed to BCRS 2102Spring 2021: BCRS UN2102The program of study consists of 8 courses, with no languagerequirements, distributed as follows:Literature and Empire: The Reign ofthe Novel in Russia (19th Century) [InEnglish]Section/CallNumberOnline OnlyThis concentration is addressed to serious literature students whowould like to pursue Russian literature but have no training in Russian. Itallows students to explore the Russian literary tradition, while perfectingtheir critical skills and their techniques of close reading in a variety ofchallenging courses in translation.RUSS UN3220CourseCourseSection/CallNumberNumberBCRS entM W F 11:40am -Aleksandar36/1212:55pmBoskovicOnline OnlySix additional courses, focused primarily on Russian literature,culture, and history, though courses in other Slavic literatures are alsoacceptable if approved by the director of undergraduate studies.Relevant literature courses from other departments may count toward theconcentration only if approved by the director of undergraduate studies.Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian Language andLiteratureBCRS UN1101 Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. 4 points.Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to readtexts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.BCRS GU4002 (Dis)integration in Frames: Race, Ethnicity and genderIssues in Yugoslav and Post Yugoslav Cinemas. 3 points.This course investigates the complex relationship between aestheticsand ideology in Yugoslav and post-Yugoslav cinema. Specifically, itexamines the variety of ways in which race, ethnicity, gender inequality,and national identity are approached, constructed, promoted, orcontested and critically dissected in film texts from the SocialistFederative Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY) and its successor states(Bosnia, Croatia, Serbia, FYR Macedonia). The course has four thematicunits and is organized chronologically.BCRS GU4331 Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. 3 points.Prerequisites: BCRS UN2102Further develops skills in speaking, reading, and writing, using essays,short stories, films, and fragments of larger works. Reinforces basicgrammar and introduces more complete structures.Fall 2020: BCRS UN1101CourseSection/CallNumberNumberBCRS entM W F 10:10am -Aleksandar414/1211:25amBoskovicFall 2020: BCRS GU4331CourseSection/CallNumberNumberBCRS 4331001/10536Online OnlyBCRS UN1102 Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. 4 points.Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to readtexts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.Spring 2021: BCRS UN1102CourseSection/CallNumberNumberBCRS entM W F 10:10am uctorPointsEnrollmentM W 1:10pm - 2:25pmAleksandar30/12Online OnlyBoskovicBCRS GU4332 Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. 3 points.Prerequisites: BCRS UN2102Further de

Major in Russian Language and Culture This major is intended for students who aim to attain maximal proficiency in the Russian language. Intensive language training is complemented by an array of elective courses in Russian culture that allow students to achieve critical understanding of contemporary Russian society and